Nazi Germany’s Biggest D-Day Mistakes

    Warfare History Network

    History, Europe

    While the Allies’ D-Day invasion didn’t exactly go as planned, it went even worse for Nazi Germany.

    While the Allies’ D-Day invasion didn’t exactly go as planned, it went even worse for Nazi Germany. Flint Whitlock shares with us his list of the most embarrassing D-Day blunders committed by the German forces occupying Normandy.

    A Convoluted Command Structure

    Although he was responsible for the defense of Normandy, Rommel, head of Army Group B, was not the “Supreme Commander” on the German side, as Eisenhower was on the Allied side. Over Rommel was Commander-in-Chief, West (OB West) Field Marshal Gerd von Rundstedt and, of course, Adolf Hitler. And the German navy, air force, and SS were also beyond Rommel’s control. Rommel could not make an independent move.

    Seeing to Mistresses Instead of the War

    A number of key German commanders were absent from their posts during the critical first hours of June 6, 1944. Believing that the Allies would not invade during a violent Channel storm on June 5, Admiral Theodor Krancke, the naval commander in the west, was on his way to Bordeaux. Maj. Gen. Edgar Feuchtinger, commander of the 21st Panzer Division, was heading to Paris to see his mistress; the commander of the Merville Battery on the far eastern flank of the invasion area was in bed with his.

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