North Korea Has a Massive Submarine Force. Here’s Why It’s Basically a Joke.

    Kyle Mizokami

    Security, Asia

    We explain why. 

    North Korea’s latest submarine is a step in a different direction, the so-called Sinpo or Gorae (“Whale”) class ballistic-missile submarine (SSB). The SSB appears to blend submarine know-how from previous classes with launch technology from the Soviet Cold War–era Golf-class ballistic-missile submarines; North Korea imported several Golf-class subs in the 1990s, ostensibly for scrapping purposes. Both the Golf and Gorae classes feature missile tubes in the submarine’s sail. The tubes are believed to be meant for the Pukkuksong-1 (“Polaris”) submarine-launched ballistic missiles currently under development. If successful, a small force of Gorae subs could provide a crude but effective second-strike capability, giving the regime the opportunity to retaliate even in the face of a massive preemptive attack.

    North Korea should by all rights be a naval power. A country sitting on a peninsula, Korea has a long naval tradition, despite being a “shrimp” between the two “whales” of China and Japan. However, the partitioning of Korea into two countries in 1945 and the stated goal of unification —by force if necessary—lent the country to building up a large army, and reserving the navy for interdiction and special operations roles. Now, in the twenty-first century, the country’s navy is set to be the sea arm of a substantial nuclear deterrent.

    Recommended: America Has Military Options for North Korea (but They’re All Bad)

    Recommended: 1,700 Planes Ready for War: Everything You Need To Know About China’s Air Force

    Recommended: Stealth vs. North Korea’s Air Defenses: Who Wins?

    Read full article

    Loading...

    LEAVE A REPLY

    Please enter your comment!
    Please enter your name here